The National Lottery Reviews

March 26, 2017 :: Posted by - admin :: Category - Lottery


Despite writing a handful of excellent gothic horror novels, including The Haunting of Hill House (just made into a film for the second time), Shirley Jackson seems destined to be best remembered for her great short story The Lottery (read an online version).  Originally published in The New Yorker in 1948, and a a staple of High School English classes ever since, it elicited some of the most spirited response in the history of that dowdy weekly.  The story is a stunning indictment of something but is sufficiently ambiguous that many different individuals and groups were able to take personal offense at its implications.

It would seem to me though, that there is a pretty conventional way of reading it; one that both touches upon a basic human truth and offers fairly little offense to anyone.  Take it at relative face value and the Lottery represents any human institution which is allowed to continue unchallenged and unconsidered until it becomes a destructive, rather than a constructive, force in men’s lives..   After all, in the story, the reasons for holding the Lottery are long forgotten, other than the platitudinous “Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon”.  And the rituals connected to it, other than the making of participant lists, the use of the old ballot box and the swearing in, have mostly fallen by the wayside.  All that really remains is a rigid adherence to a hoary tradition.

Now folks can, of course, freight it with specific signifigances–read the whole thing as an attack on capitalism (see Dave Sandberg’s review below ) or religion or small town conformity or agrarian culture or any of a number of different things.  But it seems to me that the most straightforward reading allows it to impact on all of those things.  Simply put, the fact that something has been done a certain way for a really long time does not necessarily justify its continuance.


Review of The Lotter
– If this powerfully disturbing story seems like too heavy a cudgel to wield to make such a self evident, unnuanced point, let’s not underestimate how difficult it is to teach people anything.  After all, Plato has maintained the title of world’s greatest philosopher for a few thousand years now on the basis of “Know thyself”.  So, why shouldn’t Shirley grab a spot in the limelight for herself with a story that admonishes us to examine our civic rituals, especially since she couched her admonition in a great American gothic horror tale, which still retains its visceral power to shock us.

This is a depressingly small list which I would love to expand – so please do tell me about any other good systems or books that I may have missed. (And system designers, I’ll happily recommend your products here, all you have to do is provide real proof that it works!)

1. Lottery Syndicates

Simple yet cannot fail. Buying more tickets means a much better chance of winning – which is what syndicates are all about. You do of course trade a better chance of winning with having to share the prizes. But that’s reality. And who minds sharing if you actually do win.

You can read more about why lottery syndicates work. Or check out my current favourite online syndicates: Big Fat Lottos and LottoLand.

2. Win Lotto Systems

This is a book and software package from Mark Collard/Prof William Foster. The book is a rare gem in a mine full of nonsense – sensible, logical lottery playing tips and strategies.

Read my more detailed Win Lotto Systems Review or you can get the package direct from Will

3. How to Win More: Strategies for Increasing a Lottery Win

Just good solid advice on playing the lottery. Stocks appear to be very low for this though, so don’t hang around if you want a copy.
You can buy this one on Amazon.

4. ‘Combinatorial Lottery Systems with Guaranteed Wins’ by Iliya Bluskov

Wheeling if often mis-sold, and usually bundled with crazy number prediction software. So it’s refreshing to find a genuine, and up to date wheeling book from someone who knows what they are talking about. Wheeling does have some value for lottery players, not in some hyped up ‘beat the lottery’ way, but in terms of winning smaller prizes more often. Bluskov has a maths Ph.D. and has written papers on this stuff. Detailed review to follow


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